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International Journal of Language Studies

A Quarterly Journal of Applied Linguistics

ISSN: 2157-4898 | eISSN: 2157-4901

Sherpa/RoMEO Color: Yellow

 

Editor: Mohammad A. Salmani Nodoushan

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Impact Factor (IF): NA

Five-Year Impact Factor: NA

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): NA

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): NA

 

This journal is peer reviewed and indexed in: ERA, LB, IBZ, LLBA & more


Papers in Press

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The attitudes and opinions of young students towards their own language: The case of Tsonga-speaking students at the University of Johannesburg

Lidon CHAUKE, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa | Contact Author

International Journal of Language Studies, 14(1), [Article in Press]. Download PDF | Add Print to Cart

Tsonga people are one of South Africaís recognised ethnic groups with a population of over 4.5 million speakers in the country (Census 2011). This qualifies the language as one of the least spoken indigenous languages in the country when compared to Zulu, Xhosa, Pedi, Sotho, and Tswana. In cases where a language is spoken by the minority, there tends to be concomitant negative attitudes towards that particular language by speakers of the majority languages. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the attitudes and opinions of young Tsonga-speaking students towards their own language (or their perception of the self) at the University of Johannesburg in South Africa. Ten (N=10) Tsonga-speaking students were asked how they felt about their own language. Structured questionnaires that consisted of both open ended and closed ended questions were used. Results indicated that the participants of the study not only had positive attitudes and opinions towards their own language, but they also had the same with the other indigenous South African languages.

Citation: Chauke, L. (2020). The attitudes and opinions of young students towards their own language: The case of Tsonga-speaking students at the University of Johannesburg. International Journal of Language Studies, 14(1), [Article in Press].

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On the functions and forms of metadiscursive hedging in applied linguistics

Marziyeh NEKOUEIZADEH, Shiraz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shiraz, Iran | Contact Author

Mohammad BAVALI, Shiraz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shiraz, Iran | Contact Author

Mohammad Sadegh BAGHERI, Shiraz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shiraz, Iran | Contact Author

Ehsan RASSAEI, Shiraz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shiraz, Iran | Contact Author

International Journal of Language Studies, 14(1), [Article in Press]. Download PDF | Add Print to Cart

Metadiscourse, defined as discourse about discourse, has been borrowed from philosophy into applied linguistics and has evolved as a new area of research in this field. Although metadiscourse is a relatively new subfield in applied linguistics, it has been researched by a range of scholars around the world. The current paper reports the findings of a qualitative library research conducted to identify the functions and forms of metadiscursive hedging in applied linguistics. First, it defines the topic briefly and reviews the existing, but still burgeoning, literature on it. Then, it establishes an interface between fuzzy logic, linguistics, pragmatics, politeness, and applied linguistics. The paper concludes with a discussion of the future directions of research on metadiscursive hedging in applied linguistics.

Citation: Nekoueizadeh, M., Bavali, M., Bagheri, M. S., & Rassaei, E. (2020). On the functions and forms of metadiscursive hedging in applied linguistics. International Journal of Language Studies, 14(1), [Article in Press].

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Error gravity analysis of IELTS students’ academic writing task 2

Seyed Mohammad ALAVI, University of Tehran, Iran | Contact Author

Majid NEMATI, University of Tehran, Iran | Contact Author

Jafar DORRI, University of Tehran, Iran | Contact Author

International Journal of Language Studies, 14(1), [Article in Press]. Download PDF | Add Print to Cart

This study aimed to explore language areas where students need support, practice, and feedback in their IELTS academic Task 2 writing. To fulfill the purpose of the study, 200 IELTS candidates at Amir Kabir University International Campus, Tehran, I.R. of Iran were invited to write an IELTS academic task 2 essay. These essays were rated based on Task Achievement (TA), Cohesion and Coherence (CC), Lexical Resource (LR), and finally Grammar Range and Accuracy (GRA) by two certified IELTS examiners. The results revealed that students need more training, practice, and feedback on Task Achievement in comparison with the other three writing task rubrics. Following TA stand CC, LR, and GRA. This study suggests that writing instructors in general and IELTS teachers, in particular, introduce the writing assessment rubrics (IELTS writing band descriptor for IELTS candidates) to students fully and analyze some sample writings in the classroom for the students to familiarize them with examiners expectations. Besides, it is highly recommended that teachers spend some more quality time on providing students with task achievement feedback as it tops the error gravity list.

Citation: Alavi, S. M., Nemati, M., & Dorri, J. (2020). Error gravity analysis of IELTS students’ academic writing task 2. International Journal of Language Studies, 14(1), [Article in Press].

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The impact of self-assessment on Iranian young learners’ language proficiency

Elika MOSSADEGH RASHTI, Kish International Campus, University of Tehran, Iran | Contact Author

Seyed Mohammad ALAVI, University of Tehran, Iran | Contact Author

Shiva KAIVANPANAH, University of Tehran, Iran | Contact Author

International Journal of Language Studies, 14(1), [Article in Press]. Download PDF | Add Print to Cart

The present study explores the effect of a self-assessment approach on the process of improving Young Learnersí English language ability achievement in a foreign language learning environment. To achieve the objective of this study, two self-assessment sheets were designed based on the course book taught to the 8- to 12-year-old young learners (N= 110) studying at a non-governmental primary school. These participants were divided to two levels of proficiency. They were then asked to fill in the sheets and describe their attempts and achievements in learning the chosen language constructs. A YLE Cambridge test was administered to the participants at the very beginning of the semester and in the end of the course. The results showed that performing self-assessment in YLsí classes can have a positive effect on improving their general level of language proficiency. This finding can be appealing to materials developers and test designers for young learners.

Citation: Mossadegh Rashti, E., Alavi, S. M., & Kaivanpanah, S. (2020). The impact of self-assessment on Iranian young learners’ language proficiency. International Journal of Language Studies, 14(1), [Article in Press].

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Exploring the rhetorical structure of written personal narratives: A move analysis of Persian and English native speakers’ and Iranian EFL learners’ narratives

Zahra YAZDANPANAH, Kish International Campus, University of Tehran, Iran | Contact Author

Majid NEMATI, University of Tehran, Iran | Contact Author

Amir ZANDMOGHADAM, Alameh Tabatabai University, Iran | Contact Author

International Journal of Language Studies, 14(1), [Article in Press]. Download PDF | Add Print to Cart

This study aimed to investigate personal narratives written by members of three types of discourse community: native Persian speakers, native English speakers, and beginner-level Iranian EFL learners. The aim was to elicit the cognitive internal organization of their narrative productions in terms of moves and steps. The three groups of participants were asked to write down one of their happiest memories Biber, Upton and Connorís move analysis model (2007) was used to elicit the moves and sub-moves out of the personal narratives. The findings showed that because of structural and cultural variations among the discourse communities, different sub-moves were employed by the members of parent discourse communities to achieve their communicative purposes and to convey their intended meanings. Persian native speakers emphasized temporal setting and describing the situation while English native speakers preferred to state the reasons why it was a happy memory. Iranian EFL learners transferred the general narrative framework from Persian to tell their narratives in English due to the lack of linguistic knowledge and unfamiliarity with the rhetorical structure of English personal narratives. The study concluded that the explicit teaching of the moves and steps to EFL learners enabled them to produce native like texts in English.

Citation: Yazdanpanah, Z., Nemati, M., & Zandmoghadam, A. (2020). Exploring the rhetorical structure of written personal narratives: A move analysis of Persian and English native speakers’ and Iranian EFL learners’ narratives. International Journal of Language Studies, 14(1), [Article in Press].

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